Monthly Archives: May 2013

Using a capability model for organisation change

Go and take the survey nowChange Capability Model

We have developed a simple capability model for organisation change. The purpose is to better understand the nature of organisation change and how people go about it.

The model allows us to explain what sort of training is useful given the organisation’s capability maturity (i.e. the level they are at). It also explains how to make better use of training to improve change capability. We have already asserted the need for organisations to increase their change capability as the outside world changes faster and faster.

Generally a capability model enables an organisation to benchmark itself (where are we now) against the model and then produce a plan to improve its capability (where do we want to be) which is realistic and reflects the real issues it faces now.

C4CM Capability Model

Our model follows the generic capability model and is aligned with the UK Government maturity model for Portfolios, Programmes and Projects (P3M3). Our levels are:

  • Level 1: essentially the organisation does not know how well it does change and does not realise it could improve — blissful ignorance!
  • Level 2: some staff are working hard to deliver good change; but against a tide of senior management indifference and organisational stupor — an age of heroes!
  • Level 3: the whole organisation is now doing change the same way with full senior management support; results are better but still patchy — getting there.
  • Level 4: the organisation is measuring performance, outcomes and benefits which leads to consistently better change — effective change at last.
  • Level 5: the organisation is applying its learning culture to improve its change processes into a strategically important capability — a winner.

As well as the levels of capability our model includes some specific aspects of change competence:

  • Leadership and governance
  • Processes and roles
  • Knowledge and skills
  • Managing change

We also look at the way the organisation uses four key skills in managing change (which are reflected in our training qualifications):

Assessment

We have devised a survey questionnaire to assess the level of an organisation. If you would like to use the survey tool on your organisation then please get in touch with us. It requires a number of people within the organisation to take the survey to get a useful picture.

We also have a simpler and quicker self test questionnaire to help you see where you as an individual might fit into the capability model. The model identifies individual behaviours at each level and obviously individuals will vary. Beware, you may find that the behaviours you can exhibit are limited by the capability of the organisation around you. For instance: it will be very difficult to be a level 4 individual in an organisation that does not measure change effects and does not have a performance management culture.

Its the activities that count

ChristensenHBRStrategic Change

The key to a successful strategic change is to change the things that matter to an organisation’s survival; and leave the things that don’t matter to operations.

In his seminal paper ‘What is strategy?‘ Michael Porter argues that effective operations is necessary for survival, but not sufficient.  Strategy is always needed. So I am going to argue that strategic change focusses on delivering the edge that enables a successful strategy to deliver not just survival but longevity. To achieve this a strategy must identify those activities that will make the difference for the organisation. Of all the things an organisation does only a few are critical to its survival and hence its strategy. It is strategic insight that identifies these activities.

Click here to find out how to focus on the key strategic activities

Change saturation – change centres on stakeholders

C4CM stakeholder engagement Its the stakeholders that decide if a change is a success or failure. No matter how hard the change team plan a change, nor how creatively the team designs a change; if the stakeholders don’t buy in the change will not happen. Prosci are collecting data for their next research survey of organisations. To promote the research they have released a few facts from their previous research survey in 2011. The facts can be characterised in two areas:

  • Dealing with stakeholders
  • The problems of doing change management

This blog explores the stakeholders and their importance identified by the research.

click here to see the facts and their impact

WRAP up your change

DecisiveBookHave you discovered the Heath Brothers? I hadn’t until I read an article in the McKinsey Quarterly Journal for April this year called ‘Making Great Decisions‘. The brothers have written 3 books and their latest is on decision making. This is a particular interest of mine as it relates to inherent team performance. The Heath brothers have a reputation for bringing together the research and best practice on a topic and distilling it into practical advice and tools for real life usage. Their latest book is just out. This blog is applying one of their decision making tools to change.

Click here to find out how